sour cream & bookmarks

Musings, stumbled-upons, and odds & ends
(mostly art related odds & ends)

artchipel:

Serge Najjar aka Serjios (Lebanon)

"It is not about what you see but how you see it", says Serge Najjar. More known as Serjios, the artist-photographer from Beirut has a stunning collection of architectural shots, playing with light, shadow, lines and geometry. Driven by the the concept of urban living, Serjios studies the relationships between the architecture and people who live in. Serjios also has a gorgeous black and white collection, to be discovered here.

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more Serge Najjar aka Serjios | via darksilenceinsuburbia]

cross-connect:

Hiroko Masuko “Bonsai “  Beautifully Detailed Drawings

Bonsai is a central theme to my work.   Bonsai is the art form of planting trees in a pot and creating a microcosmic scene of nature. It consists of multiple layers of various elements. The size of a pot determines how much trees can grow.  Branches and trunks which grow freely are shaped artificially with wires. To create the natural-looking, white, dead branches and trunk, a skilled craftsman uses deadwood technique to kill some parts of them with chemicals or a chisel knife. Natural plants which grow in various directions do not have a specific front side obviously. However, in Bonsai there is a front side, which means there is a painterly element to them. Bonsai is created intentionally this way.  Bonsai is the collaborative result of natural beauty and artistic work by a human, a combination I am deeply attracted to.

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caughtmyi:

Valentino Park, Redhook, Brooklyn, NY, USA, Earth, Milky Way…

7knotwind:

Circular Surface Planar Displacement Drawing (1970)
MICHAEL HEIZER

Heizer is interested in the transformation of the earth’s surface through human action.

the artist drove a motorcycle in circles in Jean Dry Lake, Nevada, to create this drawing

the photos in the last image (above) document the process from a different point of view— the photographer and camera were mounted on a scaffold that was moved sixteen feet for each for each new shot in the array